mariasducktales:

Pheasant Chicks adorning … on Flickr.
A truly special day in my wildlife garden. Mama pheasant who has been brooding her chicks for some time now finally arrived with six chicks in tow. It’s surprising, but even at this young age, they can almost fly. I just happened upon them resting on my fence. Priceless!!!
And, shortly thereafter, mama turkey arrived with eight fuzzy poults but they were camera shy … so no pictures!

mariasducktales:

Pheasant Chicks adorning … on Flickr.

A truly special day in my wildlife garden. Mama pheasant who has been brooding her chicks for some time now finally arrived with six chicks in tow. It’s surprising, but even at this young age, they can almost fly. I just happened upon them resting on my fence. Priceless!!!

And, shortly thereafter, mama turkey arrived with eight fuzzy poults but they were camera shy … so no pictures!

1841John Street Methodist ChurchArchitect: Attributed to William HurryLocation: 44 John Street
(What follows is an alternate 1841 entry for Built Manhattan: Arbitrary Road Map, my main blog.)
The mother church of American Methodism: that is to say, the church of the first American Methodist congregation.
Although Jesus Christ provided plenty of precedent for it, Methodism’s willingness to take worship out of the church and into the world was one of its great innovations. He balked at the idea at first, but eventually founder John Wesley preached wherever a large crowd could be gathered. Sometimes that meant coal mines, barns, private homes, or even in the fields. Wesley would write: “To this day field-preaching is a cross to me. But I know my commission, and see no other way of ‘preaching the gospel to every creature.’”
Perhaps because of this indifference to venue, early Methodist churches in New York favor rudeness over ostentation. Before a dedicated structure was built, the local congregation met at a loft for rigging sails. An early 20th-century historian approvingly wrote of the first church building (1768) that “Neither in its architecture nor in its furnishings did it display a single ornamental feature…” Much later, the preacher Nathan Bangs, alienated the congregation by ordering a new church that was considered a little too grand. The church was demolished in 1840 when the city widened John Street. When it came time to rebuild, rather than regress or innovate, the congregation stuck with the earlier church’s Palladian style — its trademark feature is the tripartite arched window where the middle section is bigger than the others — which in the 1840s is a conservative statement when ambitions are signaled by Greek porticoes or Gothic spookiness.

1841
John Street Methodist Church

Architect: Attributed to William Hurry
Location: 44 John Street

(What follows is an alternate 1841 entry for Built Manhattan: Arbitrary Road Map, my main blog.)

The mother church of American Methodism: that is to say, the church of the first American Methodist congregation.

Although Jesus Christ provided plenty of precedent for it, Methodism’s willingness to take worship out of the church and into the world was one of its great innovations. He balked at the idea at first, but eventually founder John Wesley preached wherever a large crowd could be gathered. Sometimes that meant coal mines, barns, private homes, or even in the fields. Wesley would write: “To this day field-preaching is a cross to me. But I know my commission, and see no other way of ‘preaching the gospel to every creature.’”

Perhaps because of this indifference to venue, early Methodist churches in New York favor rudeness over ostentation. Before a dedicated structure was built, the local congregation met at a loft for rigging sails. An early 20th-century historian approvingly wrote of the first church building (1768) that “Neither in its architecture nor in its furnishings did it display a single ornamental feature…” Much later, the preacher Nathan Bangs, alienated the congregation by ordering a new church that was considered a little too grand. The church was demolished in 1840 when the city widened John Street. When it came time to rebuild, rather than regress or innovate, the congregation stuck with the earlier church’s Palladian style — its trademark feature is the tripartite arched window where the middle section is bigger than the others — which in the 1840s is a conservative statement when ambitions are signaled by Greek porticoes or Gothic spookiness.

Alternate photo for my Northern Dispensary entry on Built Manhattan: An Arbitrary Road Map.

Alternate photo for my Northern Dispensary entry on Built Manhattan: An Arbitrary Road Map.

lostsplendor:

Madison Square Garden Theatre, New York City.  Source: NYPL

lostsplendor:

Madison Square Garden Theatre, New York City.  Source: NYPL

20thcenturypix:

1910

20thcenturypix:

1910

mediumsmymedium:

York Street F Train Stop. Dumbo, Brooklyn.

mediumsmymedium:

York Street F Train Stop. Dumbo, Brooklyn.

nythroughthelens:

Soho, Manhattan.
 (Clicking through the photo will take you to where it is located on Flickr where you can see larger versions and/or more information.)

nythroughthelens:

Soho, Manhattan.


(Clicking through the photo will take you to where it is located on Flickr where you can see larger versions and/or more information.)

(Source: nythroughthelens)

(via )

archimaps:

A projected New York County Courthouse, 1903, New York

archimaps:

A projected New York County Courthouse, 1903, New York

slaskow:

“Built by Robert Moses for the 1964 World’s Fair, in part as a celebration of the City’s municipal infrastructure, this 9,335 square foot architectural model includes every single building constructed before 1992 in all five boroughs.”

slaskow:

“Built by Robert Moses for the 1964 World’s Fair, in part as a celebration of the City’s municipal infrastructure, this 9,335 square foot architectural model includes every single building constructed before 1992 in all five boroughs.”

(Source: slaskow)